OnlineBookClub.org BOTD: Light and Transient Causes by Mel Hawkins

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D5TT482/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 

I’ve been a member of Online BookClub.org since I published Hattie’s Place in 2015, and have found in it a good place to go for support as an independent author, as well as a place to interact with other authors, some much more experienced than I, and others in the early stages of writing and marketing their books.

One of the services that OnlineBookClub provides is Book of the Day. For a nominal fee, an author can have his/her work featured and promoted on social media for a twenty-four hour span. The purpose is to increase exposure to the book, which will ultimately result in increased sales, but more importantly for the independent author, to raise the rating of the book on Amazon.

Hattie’s Place was Book of the Day on July 16, 2016, resulting in a significant surge in its ranking on Amazon. (See Online Book Club Book of the Day) My new book, In the Fullness of Time will be featured as BOTD on Saturday, March 18. I’ll write more about that later in the week.

One way I support other indie authors is to retweet, like, and comment on the various books of the day posted on Facebook and Twitter. I also try to read as many of the books as possible and give positive feedback whenever I can.

The March 6 BOTD, Light and Transient Causes by Mel Hawkins is one that caught my eye, because of my interest in politics and the current political climate. The book has not been released for publication, as the author still has some copy editing issues to work through. However, the story is a compelling one and I’m convinced that once the minor typos are corrected, it will sell well. I can even envision a movie or a television series being made from it.

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Light and Transient Causes is a dystopian thriller, as well as a cautionary  tale of democracy gone awry when civil liberties are suspended, the free press is silenced, and the Executive Branch of government goes unchecked by a weakened Judiciary and Legislature.

In Indianapolis, in the year 202x, Stephen Rosenfeld has been fired from his job as partner in an accounting firm and is in jeopardy of being deported, along with his family, to a detention camp, with other American Jewish citizens charged to be in violation of the provisions of the Patriot and Seditions Act. Stephen has told his best friend Alex White that he and his family are leaving the country that night to avoid the arrest.

Across the nation, Jews are being persecuted and held responsible for the country’s international woes, and African Americans and Hispanic Americans have been officially blamed for the dramatic rise in domestic terrorism.The inability of former presidents Anderson and Jennings to bolster the country’s image in the eyes of the international community and to provide effective domestic leadership, has created a climate of racism and fear, leading to the election of right-wing, third party candidate Samuel Adamson by the widest margin in election history. Once in office, Adamson adopts repressive measures to quell the violence.

Homeland Security has just issued an emergency order for all all citizens to register by race for issuance of security identification, beginning with Jews, Arabs, foreign nationals, Spanish speaking people, African Americans, Asians, and whites, in that order. The state of Indiana has recently come under the control of a military governor, General Franklin Renfro Thomas. The press is virtually controlled by the government and used as a mouthpiece for government propaganda.

Alex and his wife Katherine are drawn by their friendship with the Rosenfelds into an Israeli rescue effort led by Maurice Lewin, when they agree to use their home as a safe house for their friends and later other Jewish families who are being transported out of the country to safety–either to Israel or north to Canada.

The experience with the Rosenfelds convinces Alex the targeting of citizens will only get worse. He decides to enlist the help of a circle of his closest friends in creating  a new organization called The Resistance. A primary effort of the organization is to secretly disseminate information to the public, informing them, not only of the repressive actions being taken against fellow citizens, but of the effort to incite riots in African American and Hispanic neighborhoods by sending in white undercover soldiers to attack them with two-by-four planks.

Throughout the city, Dr. Ben Benjamin is known as the charismatic leader of Re-Genesis, an organization whose focus is the peaceful empowerment of the African American community through quality education and economic independence. When word leaks out that Indianapolis will become a government pilot site to convert the inner city into one massive detention center enclosed by walls, Benjamin’s followers threaten to retaliate with violence, a step Benjamin fears will only play into he hands of the government and make things worse.

Through the efforts of Alex White and Dr. Benjamin, the members of the Resistance and Re-Genesis ultimately join forces. They refer to the community confined within the newly built walls as The Free City and begin to organize their defense for the inevitable confrontation by the forces of General Thomas’s military-led government.

The ensuing battle pits the brave and heroic citizens of The Free City against the forces of General Thomas, who has been granted carte blanche by President Adamson to quell the resistance with whatever force is required. Can the Resistance communicate to the public the real truth about the government’s actions in time to solicit their support? Will certain officers ignore their sacred oath to follow command at all times in the face of the order to massacre their fellow citizens? Not only the outcome of the battle, but the future of a democratic society will depend on the answer.

The author has painted a chilling picture of the consequences of extreme authoritarianism, and in the process engaged the reader in a story of thrill and suspense.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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